August 31, 2016
The AANM's Curator of Education and Public Programming, Isra El-beshir has an excellent op-ed in BLAC this month. Being Sudanese American, El-beshir straddles many identities simeltaneously. 
September 16, 2013
By Elizabeth Barrett Sullivan, Curator of Exhibits Last night, Nina Davuluri (Miss New York 2013) was crowned Miss America 2014. Ms. Davuluri is of Indian descent, ran on a “diversity” platform, and apparently performed a Bollywood-like dance for her talent. I have to admit that I didn’t watch the pageant. However, the pervasive backlash that arose after her crowning caused me to take note. 
Alawan brothers
June 26, 2013
If you have not already found it, we wanted to point out that there is a new section of oral histories under the "Resources" tab.
August 23, 2012
By Janice Freij, Curator of Education at the AANM When I tell people I'm Arab American, I get various reactions. "Oh...uh...Interesting," as they slowly back away. "You're Arab? But where's the dot on your forehead?" "You're an Arab! Teach me how to make hummus!"
July 11, 2012
Amer Zahr is an Arab-American stand-up comedian and writer. Drawing on his experiences growing up as a child of Palestinian refugees, he finds the humor in everyday cultural situations. As a Palestinian, politics also fall victim to his comedic ways. He has performed on stages and at festivals worldwide, and produced and headlined two of his own comedy tours, "1001 Laughs Comedy Tour" & "We're Not White!" Zahr also writes and speaks widely on political and social affairs, and has appeared on radio and television, including ABC's Politically Incorrect with Bill Maher.
January 19, 2012
By Matthew Jaber Stiffler The Reclaiming Identity website was envisioned and created to be a resource for the general public and a reference for students and researchers. But it can also serve as an effective tool for educators at the high school and college level.
Matthew Jaber Stiffler, Researcher at AANM
April 15, 2011
By Matthew Jaber Stiffler, AANM Researcher One of the first questions people ask me when they find out that I have travelled through the Arab world is, "Weren’t you scared?" I get this question from family members and friends, students, and even visitors to the Arab American National Museum. I never take offense to the question, and I never fault the person for asking it. Based on the amount and type of information available in the United States about the Arab world, it makes complete sense that the majority of Americans would view Arab countries and their people as violent.
Janice Freij, Curator of Education
April 10, 2011
By Janice Freij, Curator of Education at the AANM  Although I grew up in a predominately homogenous suburb where most of my friends were non-Arab, I rarely felt that I was "different". Sure I was darker than most of the students in school, and brought foods to the lunchroom that often triggered disgusted looks and whispers, but otherwise, I felt like a normal kid. It wasn't until ninth grade that I discovered how different I really was. Let me rephrase that. Ninth grade was when I realized how different I really was in the eyes of other students.